28 Fun Ways Solange Knowles Rocks Her Naturally Coily Hair [PHOTOS] http://goo.gl/0D7Q9D 2014, afros, birthday, box braids, chunky twists, coily hair, curly hair, fierce hairstyles, natural hair, photos, red carpet hair, Solange Knowles, style inspiration

New Post has been published on http://www.coilyhair.com/2014/06/28-fun-ways-solange-knowles-rocks-her-naturally-coily-hair-photos/

28 Fun Ways Solange Knowles Rocks Her Naturally Coily Hair [PHOTOS]

Solange Knowles has proven to be a natural hair diva with her bold and beautiful coily hairstyles. Whether she’s on or off stage, she never fails to bring us something edgy or trendy.  She not only is confident in sporting natural hairstyles on her own coily tresses, but she also knows how to play with extensions, weaves and accessories and look flawless in them. I love how freely she expresses herself through her hair and her fashion.  It’s been a fun journey watching her personal style change from when she was a young artist into the uniquely fashionable and beautiful mother she is today.

In honor of her 28th birthday today, here are 28 gorgeous hairstyles Solange Knowles has rocked in recent years, showing us just how much fun it is to be a naturally coily girl ;-)

DIY Get Beyonce’s Braids In “Say Yes” Video http://goo.gl/Lg0Lav beyonce, box braids, braid tutorials, braids, butt length braids, diy, michelle Williams, say yes, tutoria

New Post has been published on http://www.coilyhair.com/2014/06/diy-get-beyonces-braids-in-say-yes-video/

DIY Get Beyonce’s Braids In “Say Yes” Video

I’m lovin’ Beyonce’s braids in the newest video called “Say Yes” by Michelle Williams which also features Kelly Rowland.  So much so that I’m tempted to cut out my twist extensions just so I can copy her hairstyle.  She’s been seen to wear these braids on vaca but I’m loving them in the video.  I hope to see her and the other ladies in more natural hairstyles ;-)

http://youtu.be/2MZxf-lQD-o

Get Bey’s look (braid tutorials):

http://youtu.be/QKLYPRmaAcQ

http://youtu.be/Q9ll64IT_-8

Braided extension tutorial:

http://youtu.be/nHe7Oc596vA

http://youtu.be/AjUwa3gmDqg

 

New Post has been published on http://www.coilyhair.com/2014/03/i-dont-care-about-my-frizzy-hair-by-shameless-maya/

"I Don’t Care (About My Frizzy Hair)" by Shameless Maya [VIDEO]

"Diana Ross your hair OUT!"  In case you haven’t heard this song, it’s become a natural hair anthem to many women and simply an inspiration to most.  This catchy dance song was written by Shameless Maya who features a host of well known naturals in the video such as Taren GuyHey Fran HeyIts my Raye RayeMonica Style MuseCarolaNicole, and Inez.  Shameless Maya has a cute natural hair tutorial showing how to add volume to your hair by frizzing it up with various tools.

http://youtu.be/d3E7kmevnyg

I Don’t Care (Frizzy Hair)” Lyrics by Shameless Maya 

Work it out, frizz it out (x3)
Diana Ross your hair out
I don’t care about my frizzy hair (x12)
Diana Ross your hair out (x8)
Rock it out like Diana Ross (x2)
I don’t care about my frizzy hair (x10)
Diana Ross your hair out  (x8)
Rock it out like Diana Ross  (x4)
Work it out, frizz it out (x3)
Diana Ross your hair out
Work it out, frizz it out (x3)
Diana Ross your hair out
Work it out, frizz it out (x3)
Diana Ross your hair …
Work it out, frizz it out (x3)
Diana Ross it out

New Post has been published on http://www.coilyhair.com/2014/03/shameless-maya-mayasworld-big-chop-video/

Shameless Maya (@mayasworld) Fearlessly Vlogs Her Big Chop [VIDEO]

Shameless Maya shares some inspirational words on why she’s cutting off all her curls and how not to let fear control you.   She was beautiful with her gorgeous curls and still beautiful without them!  As she quotes India.Aire, she is not her hair ;-)

http://youtu.be/gO5tyAwofs8

http://youtu.be/tR6S-2KH_sA

This May Cause You To Rethink Using A Chemical Hair Relaxer http://goo.gl/Dy4JsQ black women, cancer in america, causes of cancer, chemical relaxers, hair relaxers, hormones

New Post has been published on http://www.coilyhair.com/2014/03/this-may-cause-you-to-rethink-using-a-chemical-hair-relaxer/

This May Cause You To Rethink Using A Chemical Hair Relaxer

Devra Davis, author of the book The Secret History of the War on Cancer, discusses the various potential causes of cancer in this NPR radio interview.  One of the topics she touches on is the high use of chemical hair relaxers by black women and girls and how they are directly and indirectly affecting our health.  If you are not already conscious about the types of chemicals that are in everyday products, then brace yourself because the content in this audio broadcast recording may shock you.

(Click here to download audio)

The 2014 Oscars… Who Else Is Excited! http://goo.gl/PpfaeA 2014, awards, common, jill scott, lupita nyong’o, oscars, ucla royce hall

New Post has been published on http://www.coilyhair.com/2014/03/the-2014-oscars-who-else-is-excited/

The 2014 Oscars… Who Else Is Excited!

Lupita Nyong'o blue dress headshot

The Oscars take place Sunday and I’m excited about some of the actors and movies that were nominated this year!  I mean, there’s 12 Years A Slave, Lupita Nyong’o, um… there’s 12 Years A Slave… and the list goes on and on.  It’s always been a tradition to watch with family or friends.  It’s a celebration of the arts!  When I was younger, my family would always get the top nominated movies mailed to us (my dad and mom are SAG members) so we can make sure we’ve  pretty much seen all the movies before the Oscars.  Ahh, good times :-)

Just to emphasize how important the Oscars are, the expected viewership is 700 million viewers—that’s seven times that of the Super Bowl!

Jill Scott red dress

The Oscars hosted its 1st ever Oscar Concert Thursday night at UCLA’s Royce Hall headlined by Common who stated “How many times do you get to say that you are truly part of history?” Jill Scott was one of a few performers that night, and oh I wish I was there to experience it!  I’ve seen her live, up front and personal ironically at UCLA as well, and I must say she will give you her all on that stage.  I’m just so glad to see some of my favorites in the entertainment world apart of this year’s Oscars experience.

Lupita Nyong’o Just Made My Black History Month http://goo.gl/OI8Hd2 2014, black history month, essence magazine, lupita nyong’o, speech

New Post has been published on http://www.coilyhair.com/2014/02/lupita-nyongo-just-made-my-black-history-month/

Lupita Nyong’o Just Made My Black History Month

(This is totally off the cuff, so please excuse any spelling or grammatical errors…)

Black History Month has always meant a time to celebrate the good, the bad and even the ugly.  Black people or people of African decent experienced the harshest treatment in this country (the U.S.) and have been making strides to overcome it… even ‘til this day.  Now, I’m a 1st generation Nigerian American, meaning, my parents immigrated to the U.S. from Nigeria. So the culture I was raised with (Nigerian) is quite different from ‘Black American’ culture or the Black American experience.  However, I, as a person of color and a minority in this country, still accept this experience as my own.  In my eyes, we are all one.

What many in this country may not know is the African experience, that of which many Africans experience which runs deeper than people know.  It’s the inferiority complex.  Every race has it, every race experiences it to some degree, whether you’re Caucasian, Hispanic, Austrian… every culture has some kind of unspoken hierarchy when it comes to societal beauty standards.

There is the complex about having dark skin.  It exists here in the U.S. so I’m sure 90% of you reading my blog know all about this complex. But how about in Africa? There is  a childhood song that children would joyously sing which compares them to that of a monkey and praises the light skin person :-(  I will need to find more details about that song and how it even came to be.  Then the excess wearing of wigs and weaves and the emergence of the hot comb to fry the kinks out of our hair.  Then the bleaching creams which have now reached to new levels (click here for more on that).  The root of these inferiority complexes is self acceptance, which is linked with the acceptance from others.  It’s knowing that you are valued in the world.  It’s about knowing that society looks highly upon you.

That leads me to Lupita Nyong’o.  She was honored at Essence Magazine’s 7th Annual Black Women In Hollywood Luncheon and the speech she gave pretty much sums up my Black History Month.  Her speech is POWERFUL!  It speaks to the power of imagery… actors in the entertainment world who have visibility across the entire world.  When my dad first saw Clint Eastwood in movies he saw as a young child in Nigeria, he fell in love with acting.  But when he saw Sydney Poitier on the big screen also in his youth, he thought “I can do that too.”  When I saw T’Keyah Crystal Kemah’s book “Natural Woman/Natural Hair,” I fell in love with natural hair.  But when I saw a VP at my college wearing her natural hair, that was big to me.  That meant I too could actually wear my own natural hair and still be accepted in Corporate America.

Lupita essentially highlighted who these people were in her life who ultimately inspired her to her current fame. I hope you too can take this in as your own Black History Moment but also live it out in your own personal life.  Aspire to be comfortable in the skin and hair that you’re in.  By doing so, you allow others to shine their own light.

Speech from Essense.com:

I wrote down this speech that I had no time to practice so this will be the practicing session. Thank you Alfre, for such an amazing, amazing introduction and celebration of my work. And thank you very much for inviting me to be a part of such an extraordinary community. I am surrounded by people who have inspired me, women in particular whose presence on screen made me feel a little more seen and heard and understood. That it is ESSENCE that holds this event celebrating our professional gains of the year is significant, a beauty magazine that recognizes the beauty that we not just possess but also produce.

I want to take this opportunity to talk about beauty, Black beauty, dark beauty. I received a letter from a girl and I’d like to share just a small part of it with you: “Dear Lupita,” it reads, “I think you’re really lucky to be this Black but yet this successful in Hollywood overnight. I was just about to buy Dencia’s Whitenicious cream to lighten my skin when you appeared on the world map and saved me.”

My heart bled a little when I read those words, I could never have guessed that my first job out of school would be so powerful in and of itself and that it would propel me to be such an image of hope in the same way that the women of The Color Purple were to me.

I remember a time when I too felt unbeautiful. I put on the TV and only saw pale skin, I got teased and taunted about my night-shaded skin. And my one prayer to God, the miracle worker, was that I would wake up lighter-skinned. The morning would come and I would be so excited about seeing my new skin that I would refuse to look down at myself until I was in front of a mirror because I wanted to see my fair face first. And every day I experienced the same disappointment of being just as dark as I was the day before. I tried to negotiate with God, I told him I would stop stealing sugar cubes at night if he gave me what I wanted, I would listen to my mother’s every word and never lose my school sweater again if he just made me a little lighter. But I guess God was unimpressed with my bargaining chips because He never listened.

And when I was a teenager my self-hate grew worse, as you can imagine happens with adolescence. My mother reminded me often that she thought that I was beautiful but that was no conservation, she’s my mother, of course she’s supposed to think I am beautiful. And then… Alek Wek. A celebrated model, she was dark as night, she was on all of the runways and in every magazine and everyone was talking about how beautiful she was. Even Oprah called her beautiful and that made it a fact. I couldn’t believe that people were embracing a woman who looked so much like me, as beautiful. My complexion had always been an obstacle to overcome and all of a sudden Oprah was telling me it wasn’t. It was perplexing and I wanted to reject it because I had begun to enjoy the seduction of inadequacy. But a flower couldn’t help but bloom inside of me, when I saw Alek I inadvertently saw a reflection of myself that I could not deny. Now, I had a spring in my step because I felt more seen, more appreciated by the far away gatekeepers of beauty. But around me the preference for my skin prevailed, to the courters that I thought mattered I was still unbeautiful. And my mother again would say to me you can’t eat beauty, it doesn’t feed you and these words plagued and bothered me; I didn’t really understand them until finally I realized that beauty was not a thing that I could acquire or consume, it was something that I just had to be.

And what my mother meant when she said you can’t eat beauty was that you can’t rely on how you look to sustain you. What is fundamentally beautiful is compassion for yourself and for those around you. That kind of beauty enflames the heart and enchants the soul. It is what got Patsey in so much trouble with her master, but it is also what has kept her story alive to this day. We remember the beauty of her spirit even after the beauty of her body has faded away.

And so I hope that my presence on your screens and in the magazines may lead you, young girl, on a similar journey. That you will feel the validation of your external beauty but also get to the deeper business of being beautiful inside.

There is no shame in Black beauty.

Lupita Nyong’o Just Made My Black History Month [VIDEO] http://goo.gl/OI8Hd2

New Post has been published on http://www.coilyhair.com/2014/02/lupita-nyongo-just-made-my-black-history-month/

Lupita Nyong’o Just Made My Black History Month [VIDEO]

Black History Month has always meant a time to celebrate the good, the bad and even the ugly or our past.  Black people or people of African descent experienced the harshest treatment in this country (the U.S.) and have been making strides to overcome it… even ‘til this day.  Now, I’m a 1st generation Nigerian American, meaning, my parents immigrated to the U.S. from Nigeria. So the culture I was raised with (Nigerian) is quite different from ‘Black American’ culture or the Black American experience.  However, I, as a person of color and a minority in this country, still accept this experience as my own.  In my eyes, we are all one.

What many in this country may not know is the African experience, that of which many Africans experience which runs deeper than people know.  It’s the inferiority complex.  Every race has it, every race experiences it to some degree, whether you’re Caucasian, Hispanic, Austrian… every culture has some kind of unspoken hierarchy when it comes to societal beauty standards.

There is the complex about having dark skin.  It exists here in the U.S. so I’m sure 90% of you reading my blog know all about this complex. But how about in Africa? There is  a childhood song that children would joyously sing which compares them to that of a monkey and praises the light skin person :-(  I will need to find more details about that song and how it even came to be.  Then the excess wearing of wigs and weaves and the emergence of the hot comb to fry the kinks out of our hair.  Then the bleaching creams which have now reached to new levels (click here for more on that).  The root of these inferiority complexes is self acceptance, which is linked with the acceptance from others.  It’s knowing that you are valued in the world.  It’s about knowing that society looks highly upon you.

That leads me to Lupita Nyong’o.  She was honored at Essence Magazine’s 7th Annual Black Women In Hollywood Luncheon and the speech she gave pretty much sums up my Black History Month.  Her speech is POWERFUL!  It speaks to the power of imagery… actors in the entertainment world who have visibility across the entire world.  When my dad first saw Clint Eastwood in movies he saw as a young child in Nigeria, he fell in love with acting.  But when he saw Sydney Poitier on the big screen also in his youth, he thought “I can do that too.”  When I saw T’Keyah Crystal Kemah’s book “Natural Woman/Natural Hair,” I fell in love with natural hair.  But when I saw a VP at my college wearing her natural hair, that was big to me.  That meant I too could actually wear my own natural hair and still be accepted in Corporate America.

Lupita essentially highlighted who these people were in her life who ultimately inspired her to her current fame. I hope you too can take this in as your own Black History Moment but also live it out in your own personal life.  Aspire to be comfortable in the skin and hair that you’re in.  By doing so, you allow others to shine their own light.

Full speech from Essence.com:

I wrote down this speech that I had no time to practice so this will be the practicing session. Thank you Alfre, for such an amazing, amazing introduction and celebration of my work. And thank you very much for inviting me to be a part of such an extraordinary community. I am surrounded by people who have inspired me, women in particular whose presence on screen made me feel a little more seen and heard and understood. That it is ESSENCE that holds this event celebrating our professional gains of the year is significant, a beauty magazine that recognizes the beauty that we not just possess but also produce.

I want to take this opportunity to talk about beauty, Black beauty, dark beauty. I received a letter from a girl and I’d like to share just a small part of it with you: “Dear Lupita,” it reads, “I think you’re really lucky to be this Black but yet this successful in Hollywood overnight. I was just about to buy Dencia’s Whitenicious cream to lighten my skin when you appeared on the world map and saved me.”

My heart bled a little when I read those words, I could never have guessed that my first job out of school would be so powerful in and of itself and that it would propel me to be such an image of hope in the same way that the women of The Color Purple were to me.

I remember a time when I too felt unbeautiful. I put on the TV and only saw pale skin, I got teased and taunted about my night-shaded skin. And my one prayer to God, the miracle worker, was that I would wake up lighter-skinned. The morning would come and I would be so excited about seeing my new skin that I would refuse to look down at myself until I was in front of a mirror because I wanted to see my fair face first. And every day I experienced the same disappointment of being just as dark as I was the day before. I tried to negotiate with God, I told him I would stop stealing sugar cubes at night if he gave me what I wanted, I would listen to my mother’s every word and never lose my school sweater again if he just made me a little lighter. But I guess God was unimpressed with my bargaining chips because He never listened.

And when I was a teenager my self-hate grew worse, as you can imagine happens with adolescence. My mother reminded me often that she thought that I was beautiful but that was no conservation, she’s my mother, of course she’s supposed to think I am beautiful. And then… Alek Wek. A celebrated model, she was dark as night, she was on all of the runways and in every magazine and everyone was talking about how beautiful she was. Even Oprah called her beautiful and that made it a fact. I couldn’t believe that people were embracing a woman who looked so much like me, as beautiful. My complexion had always been an obstacle to overcome and all of a sudden Oprah was telling me it wasn’t. It was perplexing and I wanted to reject it because I had begun to enjoy the seduction of inadequacy. But a flower couldn’t help but bloom inside of me, when I saw Alek I inadvertently saw a reflection of myself that I could not deny. Now, I had a spring in my step because I felt more seen, more appreciated by the far away gatekeepers of beauty. But around me the preference for my skin prevailed, to the courters that I thought mattered I was still unbeautiful. And my mother again would say to me you can’t eat beauty, it doesn’t feed you and these words plagued and bothered me; I didn’t really understand them until finally I realized that beauty was not a thing that I could acquire or consume, it was something that I just had to be.

And what my mother meant when she said you can’t eat beauty was that you can’t rely on how you look to sustain you. What is fundamentally beautiful is compassion for yourself and for those around you. That kind of beauty enflames the heart and enchants the soul. It is what got Patsey in so much trouble with her master, but it is also what has kept her story alive to this day. We remember the beauty of her spirit even after the beauty of her body has faded away.

And so I hope that my presence on your screens and in the magazines may lead you, young girl, on a similar journey. That you will feel the validation of your external beauty but also get to the deeper business of being beautiful inside.

There is no shame in Black beauty.

3 tips on how to find a good natural hair care professional 
Includes a search box at the bottom to search for one in your city.
If you or someone you know is a hairstylist, submit your info in the comments section.
http://www.coilyhair.com/2014/01/3-tips-to-finding-a-natural-hair-salon/

3 tips on how to find a good natural hair care professional 

Includes a search box at the bottom to search for one in your city.

If you or someone you know is a hairstylist, submit your info in the comments section.

http://www.coilyhair.com/2014/01/3-tips-to-finding-a-natural-hair-salon/

Lupita Nyong’o won “Access Hollywood’s 2014 Best Dressed” award at the Golden Globes

http://www.coilyhair.com/2014/01/lupita-nyongo-slays-at-the-2014-golden-globes/

http://www.coilyhair.com/2014/01/lupita-nyongo-slays-at-the-2014-golden-globes/
Thank you FOLLOWERS!

I just wanted to say thank you to my humble number of 10 followers to my hair blog :-)  Please let me know if you’d like to see different kind of content on here, or if you even have seen any of my post, lol!  Between updating my website, shooting and editing videos, doing interviews, and writing articles, I know I’m loosing out on some good opportunities in between it all to share related content you all might really be interested in.  

So this, for now, is my tumblr effort :-)  I hope to continue sharing on here and continuing to provide ORIGINAL CONTENT!  

#naturalhair Deep conditioning on the GO! Here’s what I did for my deep conditioning workout:http://www.coilyhair.com/deep-condition-workout/
What does your deep conditioning regimen look like?

#naturalhair Deep conditioning on the GO! Here’s what I did for my deep conditioning workout:

http://www.coilyhair.com/deep-condition-workout/

What does your deep conditioning regimen look like?

16 month old stretched twist style
http://www.coilyhair.com/coily-twists-month-16-update